Land Rover 101″ Forward Control

This Ex-MOD Gun Tractor is being repaired by a friend of Michael and myself. Far from being restored, this beast is almost being re-manufactured into an every day driver/overlander. The Land Rover 101 was developed in the late sixties, powered by a petrol Rover V8, it was able to tow artillery, its ammunition and carry it’s crew. 101’s very made into ambulances and radio trucks too, as well as famously tugging Rapier missiles during the 80’s. Since being sold off from the MOD dozens of these Unimog-like machines have been seen in many roles, from forrestry trucks due to there amazing ground clearance and heavy duty Salisbury axles front and back, and In recovery duties thanks to there heavy duty winch and perfect rear chassis for adding a crane or any other piece of heavy equipment.
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68 FL 34 entered the factory on 19/05/1976 and was delivered to the Army at Hilton on 01/07/1976. It’s being converted with a 200Tdi and LT77 5 speed gearbox from a discovery. Winch bumper from Able Engineering (midlands) Ltd, fitted with winchmax 19,000lb winch. The whole vehicle is to bepainted in bright orange (almost Fordson Orange), with TD5 era defender interior trimmings and discovery power steering.
 
 

I’m so Dizzy!

Today I aquired the long awaited casting which sits inbetween the distributor and the engine block on Freida the Ferguson.

It came with half of an old original lucas distributor which I hastely removed to be replaced with the Duccellier which I took off my Land Rover.

I wire wheeled the casting up to remove decades of paint and grime, I then gave the inside a smear of grease and fitted the Duccellier  in it.

I’ll wait for a dry day before I fit it to Freida along with all the other ignition parts and give her a good static timing session.

Dizzy

It’s too cold.

I apologise on the behalf of Michael and myself for the lack of updates recently. With our college work busy and the harsh winter winds, we havent had much spare time to work on our machines.

We’ve found ourselves handed the burden of fixing a spike toothed harrow. The old girl has seen better days, with tines bent and and road pin wrapped up inside the crumbler, she’s hardly in a working state.

So we spent wednesday afternoon heating the bolts and drifting out the tines, turned out to be quite fun and productive.

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The Land Rover finally gave up on me yesterday, the fuel bowl seal on the lift pump dried out, so no fuel was supplied to the engine.

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This problem had been happening for a while, so I had to manually prime it before I wanted to start it. I had to get towed home from the middle of Bacton/Witton Woods, fun. It turned out to be a five minute fix; remove bowl and disguard seal, and then search our stock for a good fitting O-ring. I’m not worried about not having a guaze in place, as I’ve managed to fit an inline fuel filter.

My next job is to fit a new 7 pin towing socket. I’m most probably going to fit it in the PTO port in my rear crossmember, as I keep knocking it off when I drive over heavy fields when my drop-hitch decides to become a subsoiler.

Jake,

The missing link(age)

This evening I managed to remove the link arms and lift rods from Freida. I’ve spent days soaking the seized clevis pins and linkage knuckles in WD40 and trying to club them out with my trusty 3lb ball pein, to no avail.

With no heat source available to make the knuckles glow before smacking the rusted pins out, I decided that the only option available was to cut through the pin with a cutting blade on an angle grinder, in the gap between the knuckle and the lift arm fork.

After doing so I discarded the knuckles, lift rod and link arms as they have had it. Although the coffee grinder is still good.

Pics to follow, as I’ve yet to requisition a camera.

Jake,

Salty nuts…

^This^ is/was a tow hitch that Michael and myself designed and made for use on a cat 1 three point linkage. “Great!” you may think. But Freida has no working linkage at the moment? So I’ve had a re-think.

On the underside of the differential/axle casting there are four 5\8″ Whitworth studs set into it for the use of attaching a Ferguson hitch. So I’ve spent the past hour removing said studs and nuts, wire wheeling them up, re-tapping/dieing where neccesarily and inserting them to the correct dept into the casting. As they were highly corroded/pitted from the sea and years of moisture, (And I was taught that salt was a preservative. Hahaa) And some clown hadn’t screwed them in all the way, or gave up when the nuts siezed to them.

I plan to bolt a simple frame onto these holes which extends 10″ rearward, roughly inline with the rim of the wheel. Here, I shall mount my towball.

Jake,

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Much like this fine piece of engineering.

Mike,

Oops!

With both side covers removed from Freida’s back end, all bolts undone and a severe amount of jiggling and poking of all parts, I can’t seem to remove her hydraulic lift assembly. Even after consulting Mr Ferguson’s Bible I’m none the wiser.

I can’t seem to disconnect the hand control fork from the control valve, even if this was done, it seems that there is another brace between the fork, yet below the main driveshaft that runs through the back end.  Therefore I can’t lift the lift assemly out.